Which country is the speakers family fleeing in the poem exile ?

QUESTION POSTED AT 14/02/2020 - 05:28 PM

Answered by admin AT 14/02/2020 - 05:28 PM

The speakers family is going to America

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Related questions

What kind of listening involves asking questions and using the speaker’s responses to form new questions?

Reflection is the answer I got.

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 11:06 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 11:06 PM

Which one of the following statements contains a simile? A) the woods went up in flames B) I think that I shall never see a poem lovely as a tree C) the soaring bird quickly disappeared from our sight D)the maple wears a gayer scarf

Answer:

B. I think that I shall never see a poem lovely as a tree.

Explanation:

A simile is an explicit comparison of people or things with the help of special comparison words (like, as, resembles, than).

As we see, only the second statement contains this special word (as), so B would be the correct choice.

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 06:55 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 06:55 PM

The majority of Robert Frost's Poem concern life in the city True or False

True majority of Robert Frost's poems did concern life in the city:)

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 06:43 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 06:43 PM

Please help me! 13.4 I give you 20 points! Please It's easy But, I don't understand I'm from another country :(

3 wrong--did Shakespeare write

4 right

5 wrong--was

6 right

7 wrong--My grandparents got married.

8 wrong--were you born

9 right

10 wrong--was the scientist who developed.

2 has broken
did that happen
 fell

3 Have you had
cut 
Did you go
did

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 06:34 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 06:34 PM

Which line is an example of foreshadowing in the poem "Exile" by Julia Alvarez? "On the way to the beach, you added, eyeing me." "I let myself lie back in deep waters" "superimposed, big-eyed, dressed too formally" "We stood awhile, marveling at America"

The line which is an example of foreshadowing in the poem "Exile" by Julia Alvarez is:

"On the way to the beach, you added, eyeing me."

Foreshadowing is the warning given in the novel about any future event which may occur.  foreshadowing is an advance hint provided by a writer. Usually, it appears at the beginning of the story. Literal highlights the basic meaning which clearly defines the meaning of the setting and supernatural setting involves the presence of elements which do not pass the laws of nature. It includes Gods, demons, souls, spirits, etc. The foreshadowing in the above lines shows that the family isn't really going to the beach.

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 06:33 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 06:33 PM

What is a good poem about the Future in teenage perspective

Not sure what your really going for. However, this is a great poem and it is in the perspective of the new generation. http://www.greatfallstribune.com/story/life/2016/02/28/future-poem-antonio-jarvey/80997992/

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 06:22 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 06:22 PM

If you believe in freedom, you will agree that Deborah Sampson was a war heroine. Deborah proved that women can be excellent soldiers. At a time when women were not allowed to join the army, she hid her identity and did just that. She spent seventeen months posing as a man to serve her country. Deborah was born in Massachusetts in 1760. When she was a child, her family was poor and her mother was ill. At the age of eight, Deborah became a servant. She spent ten years working in a nearby home. She also worked in the fields. During her time as a servant, Deborah became a great person. She learned to hunt, ride a horse, and perform carpentry tasks. She also attended school. By the end of her service, she had received enough education to become a teacher. She taught students at a public school until 1782. At twenty-one, Deborah decided to do something noble. She wanted to serve her country. America was in the middle of the Revolutionary War. The people wanted to win their freedom from England. Women weren’t allowed to join the army, so Deborah developed a clever idea. She would pretend to be a man, so she could become a soldier! On May 20, 1782, Deborah performed a brave and honorable act. She dressed as a man and joined the army, signing up as Robert Shurtleff. The other men in the army had no idea that Robert Shurtleff had such a big secret. At five feet, seven inches, Deborah was a tall woman. No one questioned her size. The other men did notice that she never grew a beard. They often teased her about never needing to shave, but they thought it was because Robert was young. During one battle, Deborah was shot in the leg, but she refused to see a doctor. She worried that the doctor would learn her secret and tell the army leaders. Instead, she chose to treat her own wounds. The leg never healed properly, but Deborah’s secret was safe. What a strong and determined solider she was! Unfortunately, in the fall of 1783, she developed a fever and went to see a doctor. During her treatment, the doctor discovered the truth. The Continental Army released Deborah with honors. Her days as a soldier were over, and she no longer had to live a lie. She later married and had three children. She also gave lectures about her time in the army as Robert Shurtleff. The story of Deborah's life should inspire girls and women everywhere. Paul Revere, another war hero, spoke well of Deborah. He once wrote that she was "a woman with handsome talents, good morals, a dutiful wife, and an affectionate parent." Read the passage on the left to answer the following questions: Which statement from the passage BEST supports the author's conclusion that Deborah was a war heroine? A) Deborah proved that women can be excellent soldiers. B) She spent seventeen months posing as a man to serve her country. C) She also gave lectures about her time in the army as Robert Shurtleff. D) The other men in the army had no idea that Robert Shurtleff had such a big secret.

Not Answered Yet

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 05:59 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 05:59 PM

The two most common types of drama are _____ short story and poem. heroic and myth. comedy and tragedy. amusing and boring.

Comedy and tragedy is correct

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 05:58 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 05:58 PM

DEFINE: A speaker in a poem is ______________________________________________________________________

A speaker in a peom can also be a character

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 05:49 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 05:49 PM

Alexander the great was originally the king of which country?

The answer would be Macedonia 

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 05:08 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 05:08 PM

Nice shot! I always dreamed I'd lose the championship by a missed free throw. What is the verbal irony in this statement? 1. The speaker feels that getting to the championship is as good as winning. 2. The speaker didn't want to win the championship but feels the last shot was a good try. 3. The speaker has always dreamed of winning a basketball championship. 4. The speaker is frustrated by the loss and does not believe the last shot was a good one.

Answer: 4. The speaker is frustrated by the loss and does not believe the last shot was a good one.

In this excerpt, the speaker is describing an event. The real event is that the speaker missed an easy shot (a free throw) and he is frustrated by the fact that he lost. However, he is employing irony by describing the exact opposite of the reality. The speaker states that this was his dream, and that it was a nice shot. Irony occurs when what appears to be the case in the surface, is in fact completely different from the reality.

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 04:45 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 04:45 PM

Most poems are _____ shorter than stories. significantly a little bit somewhat none of the above

Poems are " somewhat/ Significantly"  
but the answer would be A- OR C

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 04:36 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 04:36 PM

Lady Macduff and Malcolm both question Macduff's motives for fleeing Scotland. Think about the crimes Macbeth has already committed. Why might the nature of these crimes have led Maduff to believe his family would be safe at his castle?...with textual evidence and explanation on how the textual evidence works.

Answer:

The reason why Macduff, the Thane of Fife, might have felt that his family would be safe in his castle, while he fled Scotland to join with Malcolm and those who have had to flee from Macbeth´s cruelty, would be that up to that point, Macbeth´s crimes had been caused by his fulfilling the prophecies that the three witches had given him both at the beginning of the play, and at the beginning of Act IV. In these prophecies, especially those on Act VI, the witches have warned Macbeth about the Thane of Fife, not about his family, so it would be normal for Macduff to assume that Macbeth would go after him, but not after his family.

In the end, this proves a false hope as Macbeth simply, in retaliation for having lost Macduff, brutally has his family murdered. This only ensures the rage, and the oath of vengance from the Thane of Fife, who will in the end fufill the prophecy of the witches about himself, as now his own peace of mind will only come by murdering Macbeth.

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 04:34 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 04:34 PM

Read ths excerpt from “Break, Break, Break” by Alfred Loryd Tennyson. What is the theme of the poem? Break, break, break, On thy cold gray stones, O Sea! And I would that my tongue could utter The thoughts that arise in me. O well for the fisherman's boy, That he shouts with his sister at play! O well for the sailor lad, That he sings in his boat on the bay! And the stately ships go on To their haven under the hill: But O for the touch of a vanish'd hand, And the sound of a voice that is still! Break, break, break, At the foot of thy crags, O Sea! But the tender grace of a day that is dead Will never come back to me. Life seems like the endless ocean. One man's grief cannot stop progress. A moment lost in time does not return. People do not understand the true meaning of life.

Answer:

The theme of the poem is that a moment lost in time does not return

Explanation:

Hi, the theme of the poem is that a moment lost in time does not return.

The speaker feels that all the time spent is lost and it will never come back, he states: "But the tender grace of a day that is dead

Will never come back to me".

We can assume that the speaker is feeling worried about the progress and that people doesn´t understand life.

He states "A moment lost in time does not return.

People do not understand the true meaning of life."

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 04:31 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 04:31 PM

Read the paragraph from Nick’s personal narrative. Standing alone in my family’s barn, I thought about how much hard work and time my parents had invested—how much hard work and time we had all invested—in maintaining a fully operational farm. I did not remember a time when my clothes had not reeked of manure or my hair had not held fast to brittle pieces of straw. What would happen if my parents had to sell the farm so we could move closer to my grandparents? Just as I was attempting to imagine a life in the city, a sudden commotion erupted and interrupted my thoughts. With animals squawking and dust flying, I scrambled to pinpoint the source of this unexpected intrusion. In seconds that felt more like minutes, I was successful . . . and I could scarcely believe what my eyes were seeing. Nick would like to rearrange his plot so that it begins with the commotion in the barn. Which statement best describes how starting in the middle of an exciting part will affect the plot?1. Nick will need to go back and explain why his parents have worked so hard to keep the farm.2. Nick will need to provide other exciting details in order to maintain the reader’s attention.3. Nick will need to provide a more detailed conclusion to make up for the events he did not include.4. Nick will need to go back and relate the events that led up to that moment in the story.

The answer is D) Nick will need to go back and relate the events that led up to the moment in the story

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 04:28 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 04:28 PM

Who is the speaker if this poem? A. a poet b. a young a child c. an outside narrator d. a child of the future i dont understand since there are some options im choosing between please help!! Come, let us plant the apple-tree. Cleave the tough greensward with the spade; Wide let its hollow bed be made; There gently lay the roots, and there Sift the dark mould with kindly care, And press it o’er them tenderly, As, round the sleeping infant’s feet, We softly fold the cradle sheet; So plant we the apple-tree. What plant we in this apple-tree? Buds, which the breath of summer days Shall lengthen into leafy sprays; Boughs where the thrush, with crimson breast, Shall haunt and sing and hide her nest; We plant, upon the sunny lea, A shadow for the noontide hour, A shelter from the summer shower, When we plant the apple-tree. What plant we in this apple-tree? Sweets for a hundred flowery springs To load the May-wind’s restless wings, When, from the orchard row, he pours Its fragrance through our open doors; A world of blossoms for the bee, Flowers for the sick girl’s silent room, For the glad infant sprigs of bloom, We plant with the apple-tree. What plant we in this apple-tree! Fruits that shall swell in sunny June, And redden in the August noon, And drop, when gentle airs come by, That fan the blue September sky, While children come, with cries of glee, And seek them where the fragrant grass Betrays their bed to those who pass, At the foot of the apple-tree. And when, above this apple-tree, The winter stars are quivering bright, And winds go howling through the night, Girls, whose young eyes o’erflow with mirth, Shall peel its fruit by cottage-hearth, And guests in prouder homes shall see, Heaped with the grape of Cintra’s vine And golden orange of the line, The fruit of the apple-tree. The fruitage of this apple-tree Winds and our flag of stripe and star Shall bear to coasts that lie afar, Where men shall wonder at the view, And ask in what fair groves they grew; And sojourners beyond the sea Shall think of childhood’s careless day And long, long hours of summer play, In the shade of the apple-tree. Each year shall give this apple-tree A broader flush of roseate bloom, A deeper maze of verdurous gloom, And loosen, when the frost-clouds lower, The crisp brown leaves in thicker shower; The years shall come and pass, but we Shall hear no longer, where we lie, The summer’s songs, the autumn’s sigh, In the boughs of the apple-tree. And time shall waste this apple-tree. Oh, when its aged branches throw Thin shadows on the ground below, Shall fraud and force and iron will Oppress the weak and helpless still? What shall the tasks of mercy be, Amid the toils, the strifes, the tears Of those who live when length of years Is wasting this little apple-tree? “Who planted this old apple-tree?” The children of that distant day Thus to some aged man shall say; And, gazing on its mossy stem, The gray-haired man shall answer them: “A poet of the land was he, Born in the rude but good old times; ‘T is said he made some quaint old rhymes On planting the apple-tree.”

The answer to this is C

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 04:27 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 04:27 PM

I think sometimes that if I were only well enough to write a little it would relieve the press of ideas and rest me. But I find I get pretty tired when I try. It is so discouraging not to have any advice and companionship about my work. When I get really well, John says we will ask Cousin Henry and Julia down for a long visit; but he says he would as soon put fireworks in my pillow-case as to let me have those stimulating people about now. I wish I could get well faster. But I must not think about that. This paper looks to me as if it KNEW what a vicious influence it had! Which part of this excerpt best demonstrates the narrator’s social alienation? a.“I think sometimes that if I were only well enough to write a little it would relieve the press of ideas and rest me.” b.“It is so discouraging not to have any advice and companionship about my work.” c.“When I get really well, John says we will ask Cousin Henry and Julia down for a long visit.” d.“This paper looks to me as if it KNEW what a vicious influence it had!” Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder If I could put a notion in his head: “Why do they make good neighbours? Isn’t it Where there are cows? But here there are no cows. Before I built a wall I’d ask to know What I was walling in or walling out, And to whom I was like to give offence. Something there is that doesn’t love a wall, That wants it down.” I could say “Elves” to him, But it’s not elves exactly, and I’d rather He said it for himself. What is the speaker’s mood in this excerpt? a.unhappy b.playful c.childish d.determined I, too, dislike it: there are things that are important beyond all this fiddle. Reading it, however, with a perfect contempt for it, one discovers in it after all, a place for the genuine. What is the meaning of the word “contempt” in this context? a.misunderstanding b.indifference c.appreciation d.scorn Which lines from "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" provide an example of stream of consciousness? a.Time for you and time for me, And time yet for a hundred indecisions, And for a hundred visions and revisions, B.I have seen the moment of my greatness flicker, And I have seen the eternal Footman hold my coat, and snicker, And in short, I was afraid. c.Slipped by the terrace, made a sudden leap, And seeing that it was a soft October night, Curled once about the house, and fell asleep. d.Streets that follow like a tedious argument Of insidious intent To lead you to an overwhelming question . . . Oh, do not ask, “What is it?”

1.B

2.D

3.C

4.C




Helpful?

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 03:54 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 03:54 PM

40 POINTS!!!!!!!!! Executive Mansion, Washington, April 4, 1864. A. G. Hodges, Esq., Frankfort, Ky. My Dear Sir: You ask me to put in writing the substance of what I verbally stated the other day, in your presence, to Governor Bramlette and Senator Dixon. It was about as follows: I am naturally anti-slavery. If slavery is not wrong nothing is wrong. I cannot remember when I did not so think and feel; and yet I have never understood that the Presidency conferred upon me an unrestricted right to act officially in this judgment and feeling. It was in the oath I took that I would to the best of my ability preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States. I could not take the office without taking the oath. Nor was it in my view that I might take the oath to get power, and break the oath in using the power. I understood, too, that in ordinary civil administration this oath even forbade me to practically indulge my primary abstract judgment on the moral question of slavery. I had publicly declared this many times and in many ways; and I aver that, to this day I have done no official act in mere deference to my abstract judgment and feeling on slavery. I did understand, however, that my oath to preserve the Constitution to the best of my ability imposed upon me the duty of preserving, by every indispensable means, that government, that nation, of which that Constitution was the organic law. Was it possible to lose the nation, and yet preserve the Constitution? By general law, life and limb must be protected; yet often a limb must be amputated to save a life, but a life is never wisely given to save a limb. I felt that measures, otherwise unconstitutional, might become lawful by becoming indispensable to the preservation of the Constitution through the preservation of the nation. Right or wrong, I assumed this ground, and now avow it. I could not feel that to the best of my ability I had even tried to preserve the Constitution, if, to save slavery, or any minor matter, I should permit the wreck of government, country, and Constitution altogether. When, early in the war, General Fremont attempted military emancipation, I forbade it, because I did not then think it an indispensable necessity. When, a little later, General Cameron, then Secretary of War, suggested the arming of the blacks, I objected, because I did not yet think it an indispensable necessity. When, still later, General Hunter attempted military emancipation, I forbade it, because I did not yet think the indispensable necessity had come. When, in March and May and July, 1862, I made earnest and successive appeals to the Border States to favor compensated emancipation, I believed the indispensable necessity for military emancipation and arming the blacks would come, unless averted by that measure. They declined the proposition; and I was, in my best judgment, driven to the alternative of either surrendering the Union, and with it the Constitution, or of laying strong hand upon the colored element. I chose the latter. In choosing it, I hoped for greater gain than loss; but of this I was not entirely confident... Yours truly, A. Lincoln Use context to determine the meaning of the phrase in bold. A. I have ascertained that B. I can confirm that C. I will instruct you that D. I hope to learn that

Answer:

Explanation:

A.i am certain that

B.i am sure bout that

C.i will tell u how to do that

D.i want to know that

thank u and i wish my answers wer helpful

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 03:42 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 03:42 PM

What is one way in which edgar allan poe creates a unity of effect of madness in the raven A. with other birds that fly into the room at once. B. with the flickering lights outside the building C. with the bird's comical entrance into the chamber D. with the speaker's conversations with the raven

Answer:

D. with the speaker's conversations with the raven

Explanation:

When you read “The Raven” from Edgar Allan Poe you get the feeling of unrest and uncertainty, with the constant pounding and no explanation of what is making the sound. After the narrator finds out that is a raven he engages in a conversation with the creature, this could only drive the scene to something unreal and presumably mad, this way Poe creates a unity of effect of madness.

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 01:41 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 01:41 PM

Robert Frost carefully chooses words to set the tone of his poems. What words does he use to describe the buzz saw in “Out, Out—”? 1. It rolled and rotated. 2. It hummed and sang. 3. It snarled and rattled. 4. It moaned and complained.

3. It snarled and rattled.

The poem literally says in the first line "The buzz saw snarled and rattled in the yard."  None of the other options are even in the poem. These words are examples of the sound device onomatopoeia. They sound the same as their meaning.

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 01:39 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 01:39 PM

Which image would be best to show in a brochure about why using cloth napkins is better for the environment than using paper napkins? A. a picture showing forests being cut down B.a picture showing different kinds of napkinsC. a picture showing a family eating dinner D. a picture showing a peaceful wooded area

The correct answer is A. A picture showing forests being cut down

Explanation:

A brochure is a type of paper that aims at providing information about one specific issue or subject in a concise way and by using elements such as diagrams, bulleted lists, and images. In the case of using images, as any of the other elements in the brochure they need to explain or support the main topic or idea. This implies in the case of a brochure that focuses on using cloth napkins to protect the environment, the image will need to explain one or more reasons to use this type of napkins and therefore, the best image, in this case, is "A picture showing forests being cut down", because this directly shows by using napkins the areas of forest that are cut down would reduce which means it supports the main topic or idea of the brochure and therefore is the most appropriate image.

ANSWERED AT 22/02/2020 - 12:35 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 22/02/2020 - 12:35 PM