Why do macbeth and lady macbeth envy duncan?

QUESTION POSTED AT 26/03/2020 - 02:37 PM

Answered by admin AT 26/03/2020 - 02:37 PM

Macbeth envy Duncan because he's dead and is able to rest in peace without worries. something that he's not able to do ever since he killed him. He's living with a dirty conscious. Macbeth envy Duncan because he's dead and is able to rest in peace without worries.
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Related questions

How does Shakespeare use the recurring theme of "fate vs. man" in Macbeth?

The recurring theme of "fate vs. man" shows how a weird and cosmic chain of events and temptation is unavoidably going to affect the protagonist.

Hope this helps!

ANSWERED AT 28/03/2020 - 12:19 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 28/03/2020 - 12:19 PM

The Eight Kings indicate that A. Banquo's heirs will be Scotland's future leaders. B. Banquo's friends are planning to avenge his murder. C. Banquo's ghost will haunt Macbeth forever. D. Banquo has faked his death and will soon fight Macbeth.

Answer: A. Banquo's heirs will be Scotland's future leaders

Explanation: Banquo, Macbeth’s best friend, was given a prediction by the Witches promising him that his descendants will be future kings of Scotland. Though he was skeptical about this, it out him in mortal danger with his friend Macbeth, who was willing to kill his best friend for the throne, all in an attempt to cheat fate. Banquo, after his death reappeared at Macbeth’s banquet as a disapproving ghost.

ANSWERED AT 28/03/2020 - 11:59 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 28/03/2020 - 11:59 AM

When she finds Juliet weeping, Lady Capulet assumes that Juliet is still mourning Tybalt’s death. Explain why Shakespeare gives Juliet dialogue filled with double meaning. Support your ideas with at least two details from the play.

So she can get what she wants to say off her chest without allowing her mother to know that she loves Romeo

ANSWERED AT 28/03/2020 - 10:26 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 28/03/2020 - 10:26 AM

Match the underlined words in the lines from John Milton's Paradise Lost with their definitions. You may use a dictionary or any other reference material if you do not know the meaning of a word based on the context alone. Tiles: -Distress -Cunning -Eternal Punishment -Grassy Area Pairs: -With hideous ruine and combustion down To bottomless perdition, there to dwell -Under a tuft of shade that on a green Stood whispering soft, by a fresh Fountain side -Both of lost happiness and lasting pain Torments him; round he throws his baleful eyes That witness'd huge affliction and dismay Mixt with obdurate pride and stedfast hate -Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd

These are the lines from John Milton's Paradise Lost and their definitions:

  • Distress: Both of lost happiness and lasting pain / Torments him; round he throws his baleful eyes / That witness'd huge affliction and dismay / Mixt with obdurate pride and stedfast hate
  • Cunning: Th' infernal Serpent; he it was, whose guile / Stird up with Envy and Revenge, deceiv'd
  • Eternal Punishment: With hideous ruine and combustion down / To bottomless perdition, there to dwell
  • Grassy Area: Under a tuft of shade that on a green Stood whispering soft, by a fresh fountain side

ANSWERED AT 28/03/2020 - 10:16 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 28/03/2020 - 10:16 AM

What is the meaning of the idiom "green with envy"? A. feeling jealous B. feeling ill C. holding a grudge D. always wearing green

Green with envy. Full of desire for someone's possessions or advantages; extremely covetous. ... Shakespeare described envy as the green sickness ( Anthony and Cleopatra , 3:2), but the current phrase, dating from the mid-1800s, is the one most often heard. Also see green-eyed monster.

ANSWERED AT 26/03/2020 - 12:10 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 26/03/2020 - 12:10 PM

Why is Mrs. Walker’s name ironic? She rides in a carriage, like a proper lady. She is one of the few characters who is concerned about Daisy. She is a member of the middle class. She is the one who spread the rumor about Daisy and the courier.

Answer:

The correct answer is "She rides in a carriage, like a proper lady"

Explanation:

In the book "Daisy Miller" by Henry James, Mrs Walker is a very rich lady that is always seen either seated or cruising around on her carriage. Her name is ironic in this way, as the name Walker would fit better with someone that walks regularly. Mrs Walker is a character that oftenly gets scandalized by Daisy's behavior.

ANSWERED AT 26/03/2020 - 07:26 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 26/03/2020 - 07:26 AM

Does Macbeth determine what happens to him, or is it determined by supernatural powers known to the witches

Macbeth is the one who decides what will happen to him. He accepted evil once he decided that he will murder King Duncan. Once he does that, he cannot go back to the point when he was considered to be a loyal and good warrior, ready to support his king and others. Macbeth is consumed by his ambition. 

ANSWERED AT 26/03/2020 - 06:29 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 26/03/2020 - 06:29 AM

What does macbeth imagine that he sees before him??

A dagger is what he sees before him

ANSWERED AT 26/03/2020 - 06:11 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 26/03/2020 - 06:11 AM

How does Shakespeare use foreshadowing in Macbeth? 1. By making Lady Macbeth be the first to suggest assassinating Duncan in Act I, he suggests that she will be the one who actually does the deed in Act II. 2. By having the witches make a second round of predictions in Act IV, he suggests how Macbeth will actually be defeated in Act V. 3. By depicting the way Malcolm upsets Macduff by claiming to be selfish and cruel in Act IV, he suggests the flaws that will actually be revealed when Malcolm takes the crown in Act V. 4. By showing the witches telling Banquo that his sons will be kings in Act I, he suggests that Banquo will conspire with Macbeth to kill Duncan in Act II.

The correct answer is 2. By having the witches make a second round of predictions in Act IV, he suggests how Macbeth will actually be defeated in Act V. 
None of the other options actually happened in the play, which is why all of them are incorrect. However, in number 2, the witches did make a prediction that Macbeth will be defeated, and he really was at the end of the play. He got what he deserved for being too ambitious and killing people.

ANSWERED AT 26/03/2020 - 03:32 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 26/03/2020 - 03:32 AM

How have Macbeth and lady Macbeth reversed roles by the end of the play?

I need to know the story

ANSWERED AT 21/03/2020 - 11:41 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 21/03/2020 - 11:41 AM

By the end of the play, Macbeth is seen by some as a villain. Which lines from the play best illustrate this? A. And, for an earnest of a greater honour, He bade me, from him, call thee thane of Cawdor; B. We'll have thee, as our rarer monsters are, Painted upon a pole, and underwrite, "Here may you see the tyrant." C. The King hath happily receiv'd, Macbeth, The news of thy success D. Might have been mine! Only I have left to say, More is thy due than more than all can pay

Answer: B. We'll have thee, as our rarer monsters are, Painted upon a pole, and underwrite, "Here may you see the tyrant."

Explanation: from the given lines of "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, the one that clearly demonstrates that by the end of the play Macbeth is seen by some as a villain is "We'll have thee, as our rarer monsters are, Painted upon a pole, and underwrite, "Here may you see the tyrant", in this line they compare Macbeth to their rarer monsters and even call him a tyrant.

ANSWERED AT 21/03/2020 - 05:18 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 21/03/2020 - 05:18 AM

Can i have help editing my essay? I looked around to see the Munchkins desperately running away, they screamed and rushed into their homes. The summer sun felt hot on my skin. “I thought you said she was dead” said a girl I’ve never seen before, “that was her sister the Wicked Witch of the East that is the Wicked Witch of the West, she worse than the other one was.” said Glinda. I was in fount of a house that had been dropped on my sister only showing her feet. “Who killed my sister,” I growled in a low tone as I stepped closer to Glinda and the unknown girl with two curled pigtails and a little brown dog. “Who killed the wicked witch of the east?” I said louder. The girl stepped back with a feared expression “was it you?” “No… no it was an accident, I didn’t mean to kill anybody!” the girl said, “Well my little pretty, I can cause accidents too!” I was ready to lunge at her but Glinda interrupted, “Aren’t you forgetting the ruby slippers?” Glinda said with a menacing smile. I had wanted those slippers for years now, it has powers greater than oz. What if I finally am able to get those shoes? I thought for a second. “The slippers, yes the slippers” I crept back to the house that had flatted my sister but as I got close to her feet the ruby slippers disappeared and her legs with stripped stocking shriveled up and under the house. “They’re gone!” I said shocked, “The ruby slippers, what have you done with them?” I stomped back near the two, “give them back to me or I’ll-“ “it’s too late,” Glinda interrupted “there they are and there they’ll stay.” Glinda said gesturing her wand to the auburn haired girl’s feet. The feet that had MY slippers in them! “Give me back my slippers, I’m the only one who knows how to use them. There no use to you, give them back.” “Keep tight inside of them, there magic must be very powerful, or she wouldn’t want them so badly.” Glinda whispered to the girl, “You stay out of this Glinda or I’ll fix you as well!” Glinda laughed mockingly, “Rubbish, you have no power here, be gone before someone drops a house on you too!” I ducked in fear, “Very well I’ll find my time.” I turned to the girl “And as for you my fine lady, its true I can’t attend you here and now as I like, but just try to stay out of my way, just try. I’ll get you my pretty, and your little dog too!” I was ready to leave when “wait!” the girl shouted at to me. I turned, “I just want go home, my names Dorothy and I believe even the wickedest of witched deserves something to remind her of her sister.” I was wondering where she was going with this. “If you help me find the wizard I’m sure he can get the slippers off my feet and I can go home too!” the idea isn’t half bad I thought. “Very well then” I said, “let’s find the wizard”

I looked around to see the Munchkins desperately running away, they screamed and rushed into their homes. The summer sun felt hot on my skin. “I thought you said she was dead,” said a girl I’ve never seen before, “that was her sister the Wicked Witch of the East that is the Wicked Witch of the West, she worse than the other one was,” said Glinda. I was in front of a house that had been dropped on my sister only showing her feet. “Who killed my sister,” I growled in a low tone as I stepped closer to Glinda and the unknown girl with two curled pigtails and a little brown dog. “Who killed the wicked witch of the east?” I said louder. The girl stepped back with a feared expression “was it you?” “No… no it was an accident, I didn’t mean to kill anybody!” the girl said, “Well my little pretty, I can cause accidents too!” I was ready to lunge at her but Glinda interrupted, “Aren’t you forgetting the ruby slippers?” Glinda said with a menacing smile. I had wanted those slippers for years now, it has powers greater than the oz. What if I finally am able to get those shoes? I thought for a second. “The slippers, yes the slippers” I crept back to the house that had flatted my sister but as I got close to her feet the ruby slippers disappeared and her legs with stripped stocking shriveled up and under the house. “They’re gone!” I said shocked, “The ruby slippers, what have you done with them?” I stomped back near the two, “give them back to me or I’ll-“ “it’s too late,” Glinda interrupted “there they are and there they’ll stay.” Glinda said gesturing her wand to the auburn-haired girl’s feet. The feet that had MY slippers in them! “Give me back my slippers, I’m the only one who knows how to use them. There no use to you, give them back.” “Keep tight inside of them, their magic must be very powerful, or she wouldn’t want them so badly.” Glinda whispered to the girl, “You stay out of this Glinda or I’ll fix you as well!” Glinda laughed mockingly, “Rubbish, you have no power here, be gone before someone drops a house on you too!” I ducked in fear, “Very well I’ll find my time.” I turned to the girl “And as for you my fine lady, it's true I can’t attend you here and now as I like, but just try to stay out of my way, just try. I’ll get you my pretty, and your little dog too!” I was ready to leave when “wait!” the girl shouted at to me. I turned, “I just want to go home, my names Dorothy and I believe even the wickedest of the witched deserves something to remind her of her sister.” I was wondering where she was going with this. “If you help me find the wizard I’m sure he can get the slippers off my feet and I can go home too!” the idea isn’t half bad I thought. “Very well then,” I said, “let’s find the wizard”

ANSWERED AT 21/03/2020 - 03:54 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 21/03/2020 - 03:54 AM

What is the meaning of the underlined words in this excerpt from act I, scene I, of Richard III? RICHARD III (Duke of Gloucester): Why, this it is, when men are ruled by women: 'Tis not the king that sends you to the Tower: My Lady Grey his wife, Clarence, 'tis she That tempers him to this extremity. Was it not she and that good man of worship, Anthony Woodville, her brother there, That made him send Lord Hastings to the Tower, From whence this present day he is deliver'd? We are not safe, Clarence; we are not safe. GEORGE PLANTAGENET (Duke of Clarence): By heaven, I think there's no man is secure But the queen's kindred and night-walking heralds That trudge betwixt the king and Mistress Shore. Heard ye not what an humble suppliant Lord hastings was to her for his delivery? The meaning of the word tempers is A) to be upset B) to be angry C) to exercise control over The meaning of the word suppliant is A) a person who wears distinctive clothes, such as uniform, for the purpose of their job B) a person who respectfully asks for something from someone more powerful C) a person who easily agrees with the opinion of someone higher authority

The answer for temper is C: to exercise control over. There are other indications of a controlling force in the excerpt:  "when men are ruled by women" " 'Tis not the king...'tis she...that made him send Lord Hastings to the Tower".

The answer for suppliant is B: a person who respectfully asks for something from someone more powerful. "Lord Hastings was a humble suppliant to her for his delivery."

ANSWERED AT 21/03/2020 - 02:19 AM


QUESTION POSTED AT 21/03/2020 - 02:19 AM

What is the purpose of the appearance and speech of the messenger in scene 2 ? Who might have sent this message? Macbeth

Its easy to infer that the messenger is someone opposed to Macbeths rule, or possibly even a soldier who discovered Macbeths plan to murder Macduffs family. The fact that he leaves and the murders show up, show that he did not llearn of the plan in time for a proper warning, and unfortunately Lady Macduff is unable to escape.

ANSWERED AT 19/03/2020 - 03:20 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 19/03/2020 - 03:20 PM

I’m very upset with my cousin! I told him I wanted to surprise my mom with a new painting, and he told her my plan. I wish I’d known he can’t keep a secret because then I wouldn’t have told him mine! A. writing on the wall B. let the cat out of the bag C. grab the bull by the horns D. green with envy

You don't actually ask a question here but the answer that would make sense here would be b.
He let the cat out of the bag (Aka shared the secret)

ANSWERED AT 19/03/2020 - 02:23 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 19/03/2020 - 02:23 PM

How does macbeth react when he learns that macduff has fled?

You need to tell me the name of the story

ANSWERED AT 19/03/2020 - 01:46 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 19/03/2020 - 01:46 PM

****HELP ASAP****(10 points) Chapter I, The Beginning of Things They were not railway children to begin with. I don't suppose they had ever thought about railways except as a means of getting to Maskelyne and Cook's, the Pantomime, Zoological Gardens, and Madame Tussaud's. They were just ordinary suburban children, and they lived with their Father and Mother in an ordinary red-brick-fronted villa, with coloured glass in the front door, a tiled passage that was called a hall, a bath-room with hot and cold water, electric bells, French windows, and a good deal of white paint, and 'every modern convenience', as the house-agents say. There were three of them. Roberta was the eldest. Of course, Mothers never have favourites, but if their Mother HAD had a favourite, it might have been Roberta. Next came Peter, who wished to be an Engineer when he grew up; and the youngest was Phyllis, who meant extremely well. Mother did not spend all her time in paying dull calls to dull ladies, and sitting dully at home waiting for dull ladies to pay calls to her. She was almost always there, ready to play with the children, and read to them, and help them to do their home-lessons. Besides this she used to write stories for them while they were at school, and read them aloud after tea, and she always made up funny pieces of poetry for their birthdays and for other great occasions, such as the christening of the new kittens, or the refurnishing of the doll's house, or the time when they were getting over the mumps. These three lucky children always had everything they needed: pretty clothes, good fires, a lovely nursery with heaps of toys, and a Mother Goose wall-paper. They had a kind and merry nursemaid, and a dog who was called James, and who was their very own. They also had a Father who was just perfect—never cross, never unjust, and always ready for a game—at least, if at any time he was NOT ready, he always had an excellent reason for it, and explained the reason to the children so interestingly and funnily that they felt sure he couldn't help himself. You will think that they ought to have been very happy. And so they were, but they did not know HOW happy till the pretty life in the Red Villa was over and done with, and they had to live a very different life indeed. The dreadful change came quite suddenly. Review the excerpt above. Answer the following question in a well-developed paragraph. What details in this text help the reader understand that the setting of this story is in the past and is not in the present or in the future?

I choose prompt 2:

This response is to show how the author used various words to make the reader understand that the story is happening in the past.  One of the ways the author did this is by describing the "ideal life".  She listed many things the children had. For example, in the passage, the author stated how beautiful and "modern" their home was, how children had pretty clothes, a 'lovely' nursery with lots of toys.  One other way the author shows that the events took place in the past is by saying things like "Mother Goose wall-paper". Wallpaper is rarely used today.

The story also described their "perfect" mother, who "does not sit and entertain herself but is simply there to entertain her children". She is "almost always there", and "ready to play with the children, read to them, and help them to do their home-lessons."  This is also rare today, as most mothers are working and do not spend as much time with their children as in the past.  The father is described as "perfect", he is "never cross, never unjust, and always ready for a game". The descriptions such as these make the reader think that the events in the story are happening in the past.

Some additional words that make it sound that the story took place in the past, are the mention of mumps (this is very rare today) and using word such as "dull".

All of these different ways are used to make the reader feel that the story is happening in the past time.

ANSWERED AT 19/03/2020 - 01:29 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 19/03/2020 - 01:29 PM

In the story "the open window" who is the young lady who tells framton about the "tragedy"?

The young lady name is Vera who is a clever girl and the niece of the aunt and uncle.

ANSWERED AT 19/03/2020 - 01:13 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 19/03/2020 - 01:13 PM

Annotate this text Beowulf I Now Beowulf bode in the burg of the Scyldings, leader beloved, and long he ruled in fame with all folk, since his father had gone away from the world, till awoke an heir, haughty Healfdene, who held through life, sage and sturdy, the Scyldings glad. Then, one after one, there woke to him, to the chieftain of clansmen, children four: Heorogar, then Hrothgar, then Halga brave; and I heard that -- was -- 's queen, the Heathoscylfing's helpmate dear. To Hrothgar was given such glory of war, such honor of combat, that all his kin obeyed him gladly till great grew his band of youthful comrades. It came in his mind to bid his henchmen a hall uprear, ia master mead-house, mightier far than ever was seen by the sons of earth, and within it, then, to old and young he would all allot that the Lord had sent him, save only the land and the lives of his men. Wide, I heard, was the work commanded, for many a tribe this mid-earth round, to fashion the folkstead. It fell, as he ordered, in rapid achievement that ready it stood there, of halls the noblest: Heorot[1] he named it whose message had might in many a land. Not reckless of promise, the rings he dealt, treasure at banquet: there towered the hall, high, gabled wide, the hot surge waiting of furious flame.[2] Nor far was that day when father and son-in-law stood in feud for warfare and hatred that woke again.[3] With envy and anger an evil spirit endured the dole in his dark abode, that he heard each day the din of revel high in the hall: there harps rang out, clear song of the singer. He sang who knew[4] tales of the early time of man, how the Almighty made the earth, fairest fields enfolded by water, set, triumphant, sun and moon for a light to lighten the land-dwellers, and braided bright the breast of earth with limbs and leaves, made life for all of mortal beings that breathe and move. So lived the clansmen in cheer and revel a winsome life, till one began to fashion evils, that field of hell. Grendel this monster grim was called, march-riever[5] mighty, in moorland living, in fen and fastness; fief of the giants the hapless wight a while had kept since the Creator his exile doomed. On kin of Cain was the killing avenged by sovran God for slaughtered Abel. Ill fared his feud,[6] and far was he driven, for the slaughter's sake, from sight of men. Of Cain awoke all that woful breed, Etins[7] and elves and evil-spirits, as well as the giants that warred with God weary while: but their wage was paid them! [1] That is, "The Hart," or "Stag," so called from decorations in the gables that resembled the antlers of a deer. This hall has been carefully described in a pamphlet by Heyne. The building was rectangular, with opposite doors -- mainly west and east -- and a hearth in the middle of th single room. A row of pillars down each side, at some distance from the walls, made a space which was raised a little above the main floor, and was furnished with two rows of seats. On one side, usually south, was the high-seat midway between the doors. Opposite this, on the other raised space, was another seat of honor. At the banquet soon to be described, Hrothgar sat in the south or chief high-seat, and Beowulf opposite to him. The scene for a flying (see below, v.499) was thus very effectively set. Planks on trestles -- the "board" of later English literature -- formed the tables just in front of the long rows of seats, and were taken away after banquets, when the retainers were ready to stretch them- selves out for sleep on the benches. [2] Fire was the usual end of these halls. See v. 781 below. One thinks of the splendid scene at the end of the Nibelungen, of the Nialssaga, of Saxo's story of Amlethus, and many a less famous instance. [3] It is to be supposed that all hearers of this poem knew how Hrothgar's hall was burnt, -- perhaps in the unsuccessful attack made on him by his son-in-law Ingeld. [4] A skilled minstrel. The Danes are heathens, as one is told presently; but this lay of beginnings is taken from Genesis. [5] A disturber of the border, one who sallies from his haunt in the fen and roams over the country near by. This probably pagan nuisance is now furnished with biblical credentials as a fiend or devil in good standing, so that all Christian Englishmen might read about him. "Grendel" may mean one who grinds and crushes. [6] Cain's. [7] Giants.

It is radiation because Radiation is the propagation or emission of energy in the form of rays or waves. (transfer of energy from one object or another through waves) This is how the sun's energy reaches the earth.

ANSWERED AT 19/03/2020 - 01:02 PM


QUESTION POSTED AT 19/03/2020 - 01:02 PM