Read this passage from “The Story of an Hour.” What can you infer about Mrs. Mallard’s internal conflict? There was something coming to her and she was waiting for it, fearfully. What was it? She did not know; it was too subtle and elusive to name. But she felt it, creeping out of the sky, reaching toward her through the sounds, the scents, the color that filled the air. Now her bosom rose and fell tumultuously. She was beginning to recognize this thing that was approaching to possess her, and she was striving to beat it back with her will--as powerless as her two white slender hands would have been. When she abandoned herself a little whispered word escaped her slightly parted lips. She said it over and over under her breath: "free, free, free!" The vacant stare and the look of terror that had followed it went from her eyes. They stayed keen and bright. Her pulses beat fast, and the coursing blood warmed and relaxed every inch of her body. She did not stop to ask if it were or were not a monstrous joy that held her. A clear and exalted perception enabled her to dismiss the suggestion as trivial. She knew that she would weep again when she saw the kind, tender hands folded in death; the face that had never looked save with love upon her, fixed and gray and dead. But she saw beyond that bitter moment a long procession of years to come that would belong to her absolutely. And she opened and spread her arms out to them in welcome. There would be no one to live for during those coming years; she would live for herself. There would be no powerful will bending hers in that blind persistence with which men and women believe they have a right to impose a private will upon a fellow-creature. A kind intention or a cruel intention made the act seem no less a crime as she looked upon it in that brief moment of illumination. And yet she had loved him--sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter! What could love, the unsolved mystery, count for in the face of this possession of self-assertion which she suddenly recognized as the strongest impulse of her being! "Free! Body and soul free!" she kept whispering. A) Mrs. Mallard had hated her husband, but she is terrified to be alone. B) Mrs. Mallard had loved her husband, but she is happy that she is free. C) Mrs. Mallard had loved her husband, and she is heartbroken that he is dead. D) Mrs. Mallard had hated her husband, and she is glad that he is dead.

QUESTION POSTED AT 18/04/2020 - 07:01 PM

Answered by admin AT 18/04/2020 - 07:01 PM

The answer is B. Mrs. Mallard loved her husband, but she is happy that she is free. Back then women were like possessions to their husbands. The wives stayed home to clean the house and take care of the children. When the husband came home the wife was to serve the husband. Wives were no different than maids back then to their husband. Mrs. Mallard did love her husband which is why she was trying to beat it back. However, above all she was free from the "possession of her husband" so she was free. I hope this helps and I hope you understand. Please feel free to ask questions in the comments. Have a nice day!
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QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:54 AM