How long should a resume be?

QUESTION POSTED AT 18/04/2020 - 07:12 PM

Answered by admin AT 18/04/2020 - 07:12 PM

If the resume is over two pages, make sure it is worth reading.
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Chapter 1: The Cobbler's Son My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Part A: Which of the following best summarizes a key element of Tommy's character in the excerpt "The Cobbler's Son"? Enter your selection in blank 1 using A, B, C, or D. Tommy has a detailed knowledge of his home town. Tommy is an imaginative boy who yearns for adventure. Tommy knows more about ships than most boys his age. Tommy spends much time at the river's edge watching ships. Part B: Select one quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 2 using E, F, or G. My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor Select one additional quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 3 using H, I, or J. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! Answer for Blank 1: Answer for Blank 2: Answer for Blank 3:

QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:23 AM

Chapter 1: The Cobbler's Son My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Part A: Which of the following best summarizes a key element of Tommy's character in the excerpt "The Cobbler's Son"? Enter your selection in blank 1 using A, B, C, or D. Tommy has a detailed knowledge of his home town. Tommy is an imaginative boy who yearns for adventure. Tommy knows more about ships than most boys his age. Tommy spends much time at the river's edge watching ships. Part B: Select one quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 2 using E, F, or G. My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor Select one additional quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 3 using H, I, or J. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! Answer for Blank 1: Answer for Blank 2: Answer for Blank 3:

QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:18 AM

My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Part A: Which of the following best summarizes a key element of Tommy's character in the excerpt "The Cobbler's Son"? Enter your selection in blank 1 using A, B, C, or D. Tommy has a detailed knowledge of his home town. Tommy is an imaginative boy who yearns for adventure. Tommy knows more about ships than most boys his age. Tommy spends much time at the river's edge watching ships. Part B: Select one quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 2 using E, F, or G. My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor Select one additional quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 3 using H, I, or J. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! Answer for Blank 1: Answer for Blank 2: Answer for Blank 3:

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:24 PM

SHARKS' TEETH Langston Carter The day we found the sharks' teeth was foggy and cool. Moisture hung in the air so thick you could almost see it sparkling in the dim sunlight. There were days, early in the summer like this one, where it seemed there was more water in the air than in the bay. We had beached the boat and stepped out on the recently cleared spit of land. The ground had a light dusting of white sand over an under layer of dried black mud. It looked like a recently frosted chocolate cake, though the frosting was spread a bit thin for my taste. The ground was solid, but we knew from experience that it was full of fiddler crab holes, and would be underwater at the first super-high tide. Mysteriously, to us anyway, someone wanted to build a house there. We often came to these spots to look for artifacts. Our beach, our summer home, had been a fishing camp for as long as anyone living could remember. The oldest stories told of travelers coming down to the edge of the sea, lining up to fill their wagon beds with salted fish to take back home. Old decaying cabins still lined the beach. Rotting nets, hung out to dry in the last century, decorated their weathered walls. Their broken faces spun stories in our minds. The fishermen who, tanned and wrinkled from sun and salt, hauled their nets full of splashing mullet in to cheers from the waiting crowds. The bounty of the sea lightened everyone's hearts, and the smell of roasting fish filled the damp air. Women fanned themselves from wagon seats. Children splashed in the shallow edges of the bay. It was a scene we had acted out as youngsters, building an imaginary bridge to a life we would never fully know. Read this sentence from the text: It was a scene we had acted out as youngsters, building an imaginary bridge to a life we would never fully know. Which of the following best explains the phrase an imaginary bridge to a life? The characters could never know if their made-up stories were truthful. The characters had more than one version of the imagined story of the past. The characters feel the past is too far beyond their young imaginations. The characters have happy memories of their past childhood.

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:15 PM

HELP PLEASE ASAP!!!! :) Monsters of the Deep The ocean is full of mysteries and amazing creatures. Since the first sailors left their home shores and set off for adventure, stories have been told of the strange and wondrous beasts encountered on the open ocean. With only glimpses and imagination-enhanced stories to go on, humans have made many an interesting creature into a monster. The truth is, the ocean's scariest creatures inhabit such extreme depths that humans are rarely, if ever, threatened by them. That does not mean they are not the stuff of nightmares. Consider, if you will, the following frightful fiends. Atlantic Hagfish Part eel, part sea snake, this sea serpent may have inspired many stories. Lacking the scales that most fish have, the hagfish secretes the most amazing slime to protect itself. This slime may be used to suffocate predators. The slime includes small fibers that make it almost impossible to remove. But the hagfish's truly horrific nature lies in what it does to its prey, not its predators. With an excellent sense of smell that compensates for almost total blindness, the hagfish will locate and latch on to a victim. With a circle of razor sharp teeth, the hagfish bores a hole into the side of its now-doomed prey. Once the hole is complete, the hagfish just welcomes itself inside for a meal of fish innards. It essentially eats its prey from the inside out. Like other deep-sea monsters, however, hagfish are seldom a nuisance to humans. They live most of their lives at depths of up to 5,600 feet. In fact, they prefer a soft sea bottom so they can quickly bury themselves to hide from threats. Gulper Eel Another, more hideous, fiend of the deep is the gulper eel. This creepy critter is part eel and part giant pouch. Like a pelican's enormous pouch-shaped mouth, the mouth of the gulper eel can open quite wide to gulp prey. It has a long tail tipped with a glowing organ that is used to lure in prey. Thanks in part to its tail, the gulper can reach up to six feet in length. Because its tail is so thin, it is not able to pursue prey with any speed, but it can scoop up hundreds of small crustaceans or shrimp in one bite. Often swimming through these prey groups with its mouth wide open, its large jaws allow it to feed on squid and other creatures much larger than itself. Gulper eels have only been studied because they sometimes get caught in the nets of fishermen. The depths they inhabit make it quite difficult for scientists to study them. They can go as deep as 6,000 feet, well beyond the abilities of humans to pursue them. Vampire Squid Perhaps the most frightening of the deep-sea monsters is also the smallest. The vampire squid reaches lengths of only six inches. It is also one of the most ancient of the deep-sea monsters. Scientists believe it to be the last surviving member of its order. To see the vampire squid is to wonder how many kinds of sea creatures have been mashed into this one odd-looking spook. Part squid, part octopus, and part fish, the vampire squid has features of all of these. First, it has large fins at the top of its head that look like ears. Flapping like Dumbo, the squid uses these fins to get around. It also has tentacles and a large bulbous head like an octopus. Its arms, however, are connected by webbing that allows it to form a cloak around itself when frightened. Like the octopus, it can change its colors, even making its cloak so dark that it appears invisible. Remarkably, it has the largest eyes compared to its body size of any creature on earth. Despite its mere six-inch length, its eyes are as big as those of a large dog. With its glowing orbs of eyes and its disappearing tricks, it's no wonder it's named after one of the most feared creatures of legends and folklore: the vampire. These creatures make one wonder not just about the odd members of the deep-sea community, but also what mysterious things inhabit the regions never visited by humans. What may be lurking in the deepest, darkest corners of the deep blue seas? One thing we know for certain, much like the outrageous monsters we conjure in our worst nightmares, the deep ocean is an equally imaginative source of shock, awe, and outright fright. Read this sentence from the third paragraph: First, it has large fins at the top of its head that look like ears. What is the main purpose of this sentence in the paragraph? To introduce a list of features To introduce a new topic To make connections to earlier points To summarize the main idea

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:13 PM

Read Mark Twain's "Two Ways of Seeing a River." What claim does Twain make in this persuasive essay? "All the grace, the beauty, the poetry, had gone out of the majestic river! I still kept in mind a certain wonderful sunset which I witnessed when steamboating was new to me. A broad expanse of the river was turned to blood; in the middle distance the red hue brightened into gold, through which a solitary log came floating, black and conspicuous; in one place a long, slanting mark lay sparkling upon the water; in another the surface was broken by boiling, tumbling rings that were as many-tinted as an opal; where the ruddy flush was faintest was a smooth spot that was covered with graceful circles and radiating lines, ever so delicately traced; the shore on our left was densely wooded, and the somber shadow that fell from this forest was broken in one place by a long, ruffled trail that shone like silver; and high above the forest wall a clean-stemmed dead tree waved a single leafy bough that glowed like a flame in the unobstructed splendor that was flowing from the sun. There were graceful curves, reflected images, woody heights, soft distances, and over the whole scene, far and near, the dissolving lights drifted steadily, enriching it every passing moment with new marvels of coloring. I stood like one bewitched. I drank it in, in a speechless rapture. The world was new to me and I had never seen anything like this at home. But as I have said, a day came when I began to cease from noting the glories and the charms which the moon and the sun and the twilight wrought upon the river’s face; another day came when I ceased altogether to note them. Then, if that sunset scene had been repeated, I should have looked upon it without rapture and should have commented upon it inwardly after this fashion: "This sun means that we are going to have wind tomorrow; that floating log means that the river is rising, small thanks to it; that slanting mark on the water refers to a bluff reef which is going to kill somebody's steamboat one of these nights, if it keeps on stretching out like that; those tumbling 'boils' show a dissolving bar and a changing channel there; the lines and circles in the slick water over yonder are a warning that that troublesome place is shoaling up dangerously; that silver streak in the shadow of the forest is the 'break' from a new snag and he has located himself in the very best place he could have found to fish for steamboats; that tall dead tree, with a single living branch, is not going to last long, and then how is a body ever going to get through this blind place at night without the friendly old landmark?" No, the romance and beauty were all gone from the river. All the value any feature of it had for me now was the amount of usefulness it could furnish toward compassing the safe piloting of a steamboat. " -Understanding the river currents can help you to better appreciate nature. -Knowledge and experience helps you understand the value of nature. -Knowledge and experience changes your perspective toward life. -Appreciating natural beauty enhances your perspective toward life. -Understanding that a river is not all about romance and beauty makes you wise. Only one.

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:08 PM

My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Which phrase from the excerpt most clearly suggests what Tommy thinks a life at sea will bring? A.The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes B.moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants C.What strange things would they have seen D.They came back to anchor at Kingsbridge

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 03:41 PM

My mother, along with all of my godparents, began planning my quinceañera after I turned fourteen. My mother and aunts took me to a bridal shop where I was fitted for a long, white gown, which I would wear at the celebration. I felt my cheeks grow red with embarrassment as the women fawned and fussed over me in the store. I desperately wished that I could just find a hole to crawl into and hide, but there was no way out. My mother, who was in her glory, naturally assumed that the redness in my face was a glow of happiness. I let her go right on thinking that. It was her day, I kept telling myself. I was doing this for her. At last, the big day came. My father cooked up a special breakfast for my brothers and me first thing that morning. I had a queasy feeling in the pit of my stomach, but I was somewhat comforted by my father's easygoing manner and his apparent anticipation of the celebration ahead. After breakfast, my mother helped me dress for the quinceañera. While she was styling my hair, she paused every so often to wipe away a tear of joy that had trickled down her face. I couldn't recall ever having seen my mother quite this happy, and suddenly my heart swelled with affection for her. Two hours later, I found myself standing in the front of a church while all of my dearest friends and family members gazed up at me from the pews. As I looked out on the smiling, supportive faces of all the people I loved, I had an unexpected realization. This day wasn't for my mother after all; it was for me. The church ceremony was followed by a fiesta that lasted all day and into the night. My parents served food that they had worked for days to prepare. A disc jockey played all of the music I loved, and I was showered with beautiful gifts, practical advice, and good wishes from everyone important to me. As I watched my family members celebrate in my honor, I realized that my Mexican heritage was not something intangible, like a bunch of old stories about long-gone relatives. My heritage, I realized, was very real. It was with me at all times, and I was proud of it. What type of essay is this, primarily?

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 03:31 PM

Read the following excerpt from “The Gift of the Magi” and answer the question. For there lay The Combs--the set of combs, side and back, that Della had worshipped long in a Broadway window. Beautiful combs, pure tortoise shell, with jewelled rims--just the shade to wear in the beautiful vanished hair. They were expensive combs, she knew, and her heart had simply craved and yearned over them without the least hope of possession. And now, they were hers, but the tresses that should have adorned the coveted adornments were gone. But she hugged them to her bosom, and at length she was able to look up with dim eyes and a smile and say: "My hair grows so fast, Jim! And them Della leaped up like a little singed cat and cried, "Oh, oh!" Jim had not yet seen his beautiful present. She held it out to him eagerly upon her open palm. The dull precious metal seemed to flash with a reflection of her bright and ardent spirit."Isn't it a dandy, Jim? I hunted all over town to find it. You'll have to look at the time a hundred times a day now. Give me your watch. I want to see how it looks on it." Instead of obeying, Jim tumbled down on the couch and put his hands under the back of his head and smiled."Della," said he, "let's put our Christmas presents away and keep 'em a while. They're too nice to use just at present. I sold the watch to get the money to buy your combs. And now suppose you put the chops on." The magi, as you know, were wise men--wonderfully wise men--who brought gifts to the Babe in the manger. They invented the art of giving Christmas presents. Being wise, their gifts were no doubt wise ones, possibly bearing the privilege of exchange in case of duplication. And here I have lamely related to you the uneventful chronicle of two foolish children in a flat who most unwisely sacrificed for each other the greatest treasures of their house. But in a last word to the wise of these days let it be said that of all who give gifts these two were the wisest. O all who give and receive gifts, such as they are wisest. Everywhere they are wisest. They are the magi. Which quote from the passage BEST illustrates Della’s optimism? “…and at length she was able to look up with dim eyes and a smile and say: "My hair grows so fast, Jim!” “…her heart had simply craved and yearned over them without the least hope of possession.” “And now, they were hers, but the tresses that should have adorned the coveted adornments were gone.” “Beautiful combs, pure tortoise shell, with jewelled rims--just the shade to wear in the beautiful vanished hair.”

QUESTION POSTED AT 29/05/2020 - 04:32 PM

My mother, along with all of my godparents, began planning my quinceañera after I turned 14. My mother and aunts took me to a bridal shop where I was fitted for a long, white gown, which I would wear at the celebration. I felt my cheeks grow red with embarrassment as the women fawned and fussed over me in the store. I desperately wished that I could just find a hole to crawl into and hide, but there was no way out. My mother, who was in her glory, naturally assumed that the redness in my face was a glow of happiness. I let her go right on thinking that. It was her day, I kept telling myself. I was doing this for her. At last, the big day came. My father cooked up a special breakfast for my brothers and me first thing that morning. I had a queasy feeling in the pit of my stomach, but I was somewhat comforted by my father's easygoing manner and his apparent anticipation of the celebration ahead. After breakfast, my mother helped me dress for the quinceañera. While she was styling my hair, she paused every so often to wipe away a tear of joy that had trickled down her face. I couldn't recall ever having seen my mother quite this happy, and suddenly my heart swelled with affection for her. Two hours later, I found myself standing in the front of a church while all of my dearest friends and family members gazed up at me from the pews. As I looked out on the smiling, supportive faces of all the people I loved, I had an unexpected realization. This day wasn't for my mother after all; it was for me. The church ceremony was followed by a fiesta that lasted all day and into the night. My parents served food that they had worked for days to prepare. A disc jockey played all of the music I loved, and I was showered with beautiful gifts, practical advice, and good wishes from everyone important to me. As I watched my family members celebrate in my honor, I realized that my Mexican heritage was not something intangible, like a bunch of old stories about long-gone relatives. My heritage, I realized, was very real. It was with me at all times, and I was proud of it.

QUESTION POSTED AT 29/05/2020 - 03:32 PM