What does the process of close reading help a reader do?

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 03:57 PM

Answered by admin AT 01/06/2020 - 03:57 PM

Helps the reader to understand the text 

Post your answer

Related questions

When reading a job application it is important to

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:18 PM

SHARKS' TEETH Langston Carter The day we found the sharks' teeth was foggy and cool. Moisture hung in the air so thick you could almost see it sparkling in the dim sunlight. There were days, early in the summer like this one, where it seemed there was more water in the air than in the bay. We had beached the boat and stepped out on the recently cleared spit of land. The ground had a light dusting of white sand over an under layer of dried black mud. It looked like a recently frosted chocolate cake, though the frosting was spread a bit thin for my taste. The ground was solid, but we knew from experience that it was full of fiddler crab holes, and would be underwater at the first super-high tide. Mysteriously, to us anyway, someone wanted to build a house there. We often came to these spots to look for artifacts. Our beach, our summer home, had been a fishing camp for as long as anyone living could remember. The oldest stories told of travelers coming down to the edge of the sea, lining up to fill their wagon beds with salted fish to take back home. Old decaying cabins still lined the beach. Rotting nets, hung out to dry in the last century, decorated their weathered walls. Their broken faces spun stories in our minds. The fishermen who, tanned and wrinkled from sun and salt, hauled their nets full of splashing mullet in to cheers from the waiting crowds. The bounty of the sea lightened everyone's hearts, and the smell of roasting fish filled the damp air. Women fanned themselves from wagon seats. Children splashed in the shallow edges of the bay. It was a scene we had acted out as youngsters, building an imaginary bridge to a life we would never fully know. Read this sentence from the text: It was a scene we had acted out as youngsters, building an imaginary bridge to a life we would never fully know. Which of the following best explains the phrase an imaginary bridge to a life? The characters could never know if their made-up stories were truthful. The characters had more than one version of the imagined story of the past. The characters feel the past is too far beyond their young imaginations. The characters have happy memories of their past childhood.

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:15 PM

HELP PLEASE ASAP!!!! :) Monsters of the Deep The ocean is full of mysteries and amazing creatures. Since the first sailors left their home shores and set off for adventure, stories have been told of the strange and wondrous beasts encountered on the open ocean. With only glimpses and imagination-enhanced stories to go on, humans have made many an interesting creature into a monster. The truth is, the ocean's scariest creatures inhabit such extreme depths that humans are rarely, if ever, threatened by them. That does not mean they are not the stuff of nightmares. Consider, if you will, the following frightful fiends. Atlantic Hagfish Part eel, part sea snake, this sea serpent may have inspired many stories. Lacking the scales that most fish have, the hagfish secretes the most amazing slime to protect itself. This slime may be used to suffocate predators. The slime includes small fibers that make it almost impossible to remove. But the hagfish's truly horrific nature lies in what it does to its prey, not its predators. With an excellent sense of smell that compensates for almost total blindness, the hagfish will locate and latch on to a victim. With a circle of razor sharp teeth, the hagfish bores a hole into the side of its now-doomed prey. Once the hole is complete, the hagfish just welcomes itself inside for a meal of fish innards. It essentially eats its prey from the inside out. Like other deep-sea monsters, however, hagfish are seldom a nuisance to humans. They live most of their lives at depths of up to 5,600 feet. In fact, they prefer a soft sea bottom so they can quickly bury themselves to hide from threats. Gulper Eel Another, more hideous, fiend of the deep is the gulper eel. This creepy critter is part eel and part giant pouch. Like a pelican's enormous pouch-shaped mouth, the mouth of the gulper eel can open quite wide to gulp prey. It has a long tail tipped with a glowing organ that is used to lure in prey. Thanks in part to its tail, the gulper can reach up to six feet in length. Because its tail is so thin, it is not able to pursue prey with any speed, but it can scoop up hundreds of small crustaceans or shrimp in one bite. Often swimming through these prey groups with its mouth wide open, its large jaws allow it to feed on squid and other creatures much larger than itself. Gulper eels have only been studied because they sometimes get caught in the nets of fishermen. The depths they inhabit make it quite difficult for scientists to study them. They can go as deep as 6,000 feet, well beyond the abilities of humans to pursue them. Vampire Squid Perhaps the most frightening of the deep-sea monsters is also the smallest. The vampire squid reaches lengths of only six inches. It is also one of the most ancient of the deep-sea monsters. Scientists believe it to be the last surviving member of its order. To see the vampire squid is to wonder how many kinds of sea creatures have been mashed into this one odd-looking spook. Part squid, part octopus, and part fish, the vampire squid has features of all of these. First, it has large fins at the top of its head that look like ears. Flapping like Dumbo, the squid uses these fins to get around. It also has tentacles and a large bulbous head like an octopus. Its arms, however, are connected by webbing that allows it to form a cloak around itself when frightened. Like the octopus, it can change its colors, even making its cloak so dark that it appears invisible. Remarkably, it has the largest eyes compared to its body size of any creature on earth. Despite its mere six-inch length, its eyes are as big as those of a large dog. With its glowing orbs of eyes and its disappearing tricks, it's no wonder it's named after one of the most feared creatures of legends and folklore: the vampire. These creatures make one wonder not just about the odd members of the deep-sea community, but also what mysterious things inhabit the regions never visited by humans. What may be lurking in the deepest, darkest corners of the deep blue seas? One thing we know for certain, much like the outrageous monsters we conjure in our worst nightmares, the deep ocean is an equally imaginative source of shock, awe, and outright fright. Read this sentence from the third paragraph: First, it has large fins at the top of its head that look like ears. What is the main purpose of this sentence in the paragraph? To introduce a list of features To introduce a new topic To make connections to earlier points To summarize the main idea

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:13 PM