Which transition phrase introduces a summary? In addition In spite of On the whole On this occasion

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 03:59 PM

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Chapter 1: The Cobbler's Son My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Part A: Which of the following best summarizes a key element of Tommy's character in the excerpt "The Cobbler's Son"? Enter your selection in blank 1 using A, B, C, or D. Tommy has a detailed knowledge of his home town. Tommy is an imaginative boy who yearns for adventure. Tommy knows more about ships than most boys his age. Tommy spends much time at the river's edge watching ships. Part B: Select one quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 2 using E, F, or G. My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor Select one additional quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 3 using H, I, or J. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! Answer for Blank 1: Answer for Blank 2: Answer for Blank 3:

QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:23 AM

Chapter 1: The Cobbler's Son My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Part A: Which of the following best summarizes a key element of Tommy's character in the excerpt "The Cobbler's Son"? Enter your selection in blank 1 using A, B, C, or D. Tommy has a detailed knowledge of his home town. Tommy is an imaginative boy who yearns for adventure. Tommy knows more about ships than most boys his age. Tommy spends much time at the river's edge watching ships. Part B: Select one quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 2 using E, F, or G. My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor Select one additional quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 3 using H, I, or J. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! Answer for Blank 1: Answer for Blank 2: Answer for Blank 3:

QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:18 AM

My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Part A: Which of the following best summarizes a key element of Tommy's character in the excerpt "The Cobbler's Son"? Enter your selection in blank 1 using A, B, C, or D. Tommy has a detailed knowledge of his home town. Tommy is an imaginative boy who yearns for adventure. Tommy knows more about ships than most boys his age. Tommy spends much time at the river's edge watching ships. Part B: Select one quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 2 using E, F, or G. My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor Select one additional quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 3 using H, I, or J. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! Answer for Blank 1: Answer for Blank 2: Answer for Blank 3:

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:24 PM

Summary of The Beginnings of the Maasai.”

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:23 PM

SHARKS' TEETH Langston Carter The day we found the sharks' teeth was foggy and cool. Moisture hung in the air so thick you could almost see it sparkling in the dim sunlight. There were days, early in the summer like this one, where it seemed there was more water in the air than in the bay. We had beached the boat and stepped out on the recently cleared spit of land. The ground had a light dusting of white sand over an under layer of dried black mud. It looked like a recently frosted chocolate cake, though the frosting was spread a bit thin for my taste. The ground was solid, but we knew from experience that it was full of fiddler crab holes, and would be underwater at the first super-high tide. Mysteriously, to us anyway, someone wanted to build a house there. We often came to these spots to look for artifacts. Our beach, our summer home, had been a fishing camp for as long as anyone living could remember. The oldest stories told of travelers coming down to the edge of the sea, lining up to fill their wagon beds with salted fish to take back home. Old decaying cabins still lined the beach. Rotting nets, hung out to dry in the last century, decorated their weathered walls. Their broken faces spun stories in our minds. The fishermen who, tanned and wrinkled from sun and salt, hauled their nets full of splashing mullet in to cheers from the waiting crowds. The bounty of the sea lightened everyone's hearts, and the smell of roasting fish filled the damp air. Women fanned themselves from wagon seats. Children splashed in the shallow edges of the bay. It was a scene we had acted out as youngsters, building an imaginary bridge to a life we would never fully know. Read this sentence from the text: It was a scene we had acted out as youngsters, building an imaginary bridge to a life we would never fully know. Which of the following best explains the phrase an imaginary bridge to a life? The characters could never know if their made-up stories were truthful. The characters had more than one version of the imagined story of the past. The characters feel the past is too far beyond their young imaginations. The characters have happy memories of their past childhood.

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:15 PM

HELP PLEASE ASAP!!!! :) Monsters of the Deep The ocean is full of mysteries and amazing creatures. Since the first sailors left their home shores and set off for adventure, stories have been told of the strange and wondrous beasts encountered on the open ocean. With only glimpses and imagination-enhanced stories to go on, humans have made many an interesting creature into a monster. The truth is, the ocean's scariest creatures inhabit such extreme depths that humans are rarely, if ever, threatened by them. That does not mean they are not the stuff of nightmares. Consider, if you will, the following frightful fiends. Atlantic Hagfish Part eel, part sea snake, this sea serpent may have inspired many stories. Lacking the scales that most fish have, the hagfish secretes the most amazing slime to protect itself. This slime may be used to suffocate predators. The slime includes small fibers that make it almost impossible to remove. But the hagfish's truly horrific nature lies in what it does to its prey, not its predators. With an excellent sense of smell that compensates for almost total blindness, the hagfish will locate and latch on to a victim. With a circle of razor sharp teeth, the hagfish bores a hole into the side of its now-doomed prey. Once the hole is complete, the hagfish just welcomes itself inside for a meal of fish innards. It essentially eats its prey from the inside out. Like other deep-sea monsters, however, hagfish are seldom a nuisance to humans. They live most of their lives at depths of up to 5,600 feet. In fact, they prefer a soft sea bottom so they can quickly bury themselves to hide from threats. Gulper Eel Another, more hideous, fiend of the deep is the gulper eel. This creepy critter is part eel and part giant pouch. Like a pelican's enormous pouch-shaped mouth, the mouth of the gulper eel can open quite wide to gulp prey. It has a long tail tipped with a glowing organ that is used to lure in prey. Thanks in part to its tail, the gulper can reach up to six feet in length. Because its tail is so thin, it is not able to pursue prey with any speed, but it can scoop up hundreds of small crustaceans or shrimp in one bite. Often swimming through these prey groups with its mouth wide open, its large jaws allow it to feed on squid and other creatures much larger than itself. Gulper eels have only been studied because they sometimes get caught in the nets of fishermen. The depths they inhabit make it quite difficult for scientists to study them. They can go as deep as 6,000 feet, well beyond the abilities of humans to pursue them. Vampire Squid Perhaps the most frightening of the deep-sea monsters is also the smallest. The vampire squid reaches lengths of only six inches. It is also one of the most ancient of the deep-sea monsters. Scientists believe it to be the last surviving member of its order. To see the vampire squid is to wonder how many kinds of sea creatures have been mashed into this one odd-looking spook. Part squid, part octopus, and part fish, the vampire squid has features of all of these. First, it has large fins at the top of its head that look like ears. Flapping like Dumbo, the squid uses these fins to get around. It also has tentacles and a large bulbous head like an octopus. Its arms, however, are connected by webbing that allows it to form a cloak around itself when frightened. Like the octopus, it can change its colors, even making its cloak so dark that it appears invisible. Remarkably, it has the largest eyes compared to its body size of any creature on earth. Despite its mere six-inch length, its eyes are as big as those of a large dog. With its glowing orbs of eyes and its disappearing tricks, it's no wonder it's named after one of the most feared creatures of legends and folklore: the vampire. These creatures make one wonder not just about the odd members of the deep-sea community, but also what mysterious things inhabit the regions never visited by humans. What may be lurking in the deepest, darkest corners of the deep blue seas? One thing we know for certain, much like the outrageous monsters we conjure in our worst nightmares, the deep ocean is an equally imaginative source of shock, awe, and outright fright. Read this sentence from the third paragraph: First, it has large fins at the top of its head that look like ears. What is the main purpose of this sentence in the paragraph? To introduce a list of features To introduce a new topic To make connections to earlier points To summarize the main idea

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:13 PM

My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Which phrase from the excerpt most clearly suggests what Tommy thinks a life at sea will bring? A.The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes B.moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants C.What strange things would they have seen D.They came back to anchor at Kingsbridge

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 03:41 PM

Read the excerpt from “The Scarlet Ibis.” That summer, the summer of 1918, was blighted. In May and June there was no rain and the crops withered, curled up, then died under the thirsty sun. One morning in July a hurricane came out of the east, tipping over the oaks in the yard and splitting the limbs of the elm trees. That afternoon it roared back out of the west, blew the fallen oaks around, snapping their roots and tearing them out of the earth like a hawk at the entrails of a chicken. Cotton bolls were wrenched from the stalks and lay like green walnuts in the valleys between the rows, while the cornfield leaned over uniformly so that the tassels touched the ground. Doodle and I followed Daddy out into the cotton field, where he stood, shoulders sagging, surveying the ruin. When his chin sank down onto his chest, we were frightened, and Doodle slipped his hand into mine. Suddenly Daddy straightened his shoulders, raised his giant knuckly fist, and with a voice that seemed to rumble out of the earth itself began cursing heaven, hell, the weather, and the Republican Party. Doodle and I, prodding each other and giggling, went back to the house, knowing that everything would be all right. Which phrases are examples of sensory imagery that make the details of the setting more vivid? Check all that apply.1. crops withered, curled up, then died under the thirsty sun 2.morning in July a hurricane came out of the east3. snapping their roots and tearing them out of the earth 4. a voice that seemed to rumble out of the earth itself 5. prodding each other and giggling, went back to the house

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 02:34 PM

What is most likely the speaker's intent in this excerpt from the speech? The Hypocrisy of American Slavery by Frederick Douglass (excerpt) Fellow citizens, above your national, tumultuous joy, I hear the mournful wail of millions, whose chains, heavy and grievous yesterday, are today rendered more intolerable by the jubilant shouts that reach them. If I do forget, if I do not remember those bleeding children of sorrow this day, "may my right hand forget her cunning, and may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth!" To forget them, to pass lightly over their wrongs and to chime in with the popular theme would be treason most scandalous and shocking, and would make me a reproach before God and the world. My subject, then, fellow citizens, is "American Slavery." I shall see this day and its popular characteristics from the slave's point of view. Standing here, identified with the American bondman, making his wrongs mine, I do not hesitate to declare, with all my soul, that the character and conduct of this nation never looked blacker to me than on this Fourth of July. Whether we turn to the declarations of the past, or to the professions of the present, the conduct of the nation seems equally hideous and revolting. America is false to the past, false to the present, and solemnly binds herself to be false to the future. Standing with God and the crushed and bleeding slave on this occasion, I will, in the name of humanity, which is outraged, in the name of liberty, which is fettered, in the name of the Constitution and the Bible, which are disregarded and trampled upon, dare to call in question and to denounce, with all the emphasis I can command, everything that serves to perpetuate slavery -- the great sin and shame of America! "I will not equivocate - I will not excuse." I will use the severest language I can command, and yet not one word shall escape me that any man, whose judgment is not blinded by prejudice, or who is not at heart a slave-holder, shall not confess to be right and just. A.to convey the horrors and barbarity faced by millions of slaves due to the oppressive laws of the state B.to criticize the white population for celebrating liberty while enforcing slavery on the black population C.to mock the white population's arrogance about the superiority of their race compared to the black slaves to question the beliefs and principles on which the US Constitution was formed D.to criticize the nation for not allowing the black slaves to participate in their celebration of Independence Day

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 02:13 PM