Instructions:Select the correct answer. What is the situational irony in the story “Federigo’s Falcon” by Giovanni Boccaccio? A. Monna marries Federigo in the end, although she is not in love with him. B. Monna’s son has a terminal illness, so the falcon can't save him. C. The only time Monna asks Federigo for something, he can't give it to her. D. Federigo’s falcon dies a pointless death.

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:16 PM

Answered by admin AT 01/06/2020 - 04:16 PM

A.  because It would be completely unexpected for someone to marry someone that they are not in love with.
Post your answer

Related questions

Chapter 1: The Cobbler's Son My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Part A: Which of the following best summarizes a key element of Tommy's character in the excerpt "The Cobbler's Son"? Enter your selection in blank 1 using A, B, C, or D. Tommy has a detailed knowledge of his home town. Tommy is an imaginative boy who yearns for adventure. Tommy knows more about ships than most boys his age. Tommy spends much time at the river's edge watching ships. Part B: Select one quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 2 using E, F, or G. My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor Select one additional quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 3 using H, I, or J. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! Answer for Blank 1: Answer for Blank 2: Answer for Blank 3:

QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:23 AM

Chapter 1: The Cobbler's Son My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Part A: Which of the following best summarizes a key element of Tommy's character in the excerpt "The Cobbler's Son"? Enter your selection in blank 1 using A, B, C, or D. Tommy has a detailed knowledge of his home town. Tommy is an imaginative boy who yearns for adventure. Tommy knows more about ships than most boys his age. Tommy spends much time at the river's edge watching ships. Part B: Select one quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 2 using E, F, or G. My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor Select one additional quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 3 using H, I, or J. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! Answer for Blank 1: Answer for Blank 2: Answer for Blank 3:

QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:18 AM

Three little vessels—the Susan Constant, the Godspeed, and the Discovery—left England in December, 1606, under the command of Captain Christopher Newport, to found a colony on the distant shores of Virginia. Two decades earlier Sir Walter Raleigh had sent out a group of settlers to what is now North Carolina, and they had disappeared mysteriously. What had happened to them? men asked. Had they been killed by the Indians? Had they fallen victims to disease? Had they starved? Those who shared in this new venture must have wondered if a like fate awaited them in this strange new land. But their spirits rose when they entered Chesapeake Bay. Landing parties were delighted with the "fair meddowes ... full of flowers of divers kinds and colors," the "goodly tall trees," and the streams of fresh water. It was a smiling country which seemed to bid them welcome. But when they entered the mouth of a broad river, which they called the James in honor of their King, and made their way up into the country, new doubts must have assailed them. They knew that savages lived in the dense forests which lined both banks; might not strange wild beasts live there also? Might there not be fatal diseases unknown in Europe? What is the main point of the second paragraph of the "Give Me Liberty" excerpt? Despite a cheerful landing, worries were high. Spirits were high upon landing. The settlers chose to honor their king. The land had much to offer the settlers.

QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:14 AM

Three little vessels—the Susan Constant, the Godspeed, and the Discovery—left England in December, 1606, under the command of Captain Christopher Newport, to found a colony on the distant shores of Virginia. Two decades earlier Sir Walter Raleigh had sent out a group of settlers to what is now North Carolina, and they had disappeared mysteriously. What had happened to them? men asked. Had they been killed by the Indians? Had they fallen victims to disease? Had they starved? Those who shared in this new venture must have wondered if a like fate awaited them in this strange new land. But their spirits rose when they entered Chesapeake Bay. Landing parties were delighted with the "fair meddowes ... full of flowers of divers kinds and colors," the "goodly tall trees," and the streams of fresh water. It was a smiling country which seemed to bid them welcome. But when they entered the mouth of a broad river, which they called the James in honor of their King, and made their way up into the country, new doubts must have assailed them. They knew that savages lived in the dense forests which lined both banks; might not strange wild beasts live there also? Might there not be fatal diseases unknown in Europe? Review the end of the first paragraph in the "Give Me Liberty" excerpt. What is the main point of the questions at the end of the paragraph? The fate of early settlers was uncertain. The new settlers had much to fear. The new settlers had less to fear than the earlier ones. The new colony was not in North Carolina.

QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:12 AM