Which element of a Shakespearean tragedy does Romeo represent in Act V, scene iii of Romeo and Juliet? a flawed hero a devious trickster a wise mentor a violent foil

QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:12 AM

Answered by admin AT 02/06/2020 - 01:12 AM

The answer to this question is the letter C which is "a wise mentor.  This is the element of a Shakespearean tragedy does Romeo represents in Act V scene and it was very not catastrophic instead it is joyful and proud. They will even make a statue of pure gold signifies highness and recognition.
Post your answer

Related questions

Excerpt, Theodore Roosevelt, Inaugural Address Saturday, March 4, 1905 My fellow-citizens, no people on earth have more cause to be thankful than ours, and this is said reverently, in no spirit of boastfulness in our own strength, but with gratitude to the Giver of Good who has blessed us with the conditions which have enabled us to achieve so large a measure of well-being and of happiness. To us as a people it has been granted to lay the foundations of our national life in a new continent. We are the heirs of the ages, and yet we have had to pay few of the penalties which in old countries are exacted by the dead hand of a bygone civilization. We have not been obliged to fight for our existence against any alien race; and yet our life has called for the vigor and effort without which the manlier and hardier virtues wither away. Under such conditions it would be our own fault if we failed; and the success which we have had in the past, the success which we confidently believe the future will bring, should cause in us no feeling of [vanity], but rather a deep and abiding realization of all which life has offered us; a full acknowledgment of the responsibility which is ours; and a fixed determination to show that under a free government a mighty people can thrive best, alike as regards the things of the body and the things of the soul. Much has been given us, and much will rightfully be expected from us. We have duties to others and duties to ourselves; and we can shirk neither. We have become a great nation, forced by the fact of its greatness into relations with the other nations of the earth, and we must behave as beseems a people with such responsibilities. Toward all other nations, large and small, our attitude must be one of cordial and sincere friendship. We must show not only in our words, but in our deeds, that we are earnestly desirous of securing their good will by acting toward them in a spirit of just and generous recognition of all their rights. But justice and generosity in a nation, as in an individual, count most when shown not by the weak but by the strong. While ever careful to refrain from wrongdoing others, we must be no less insistent that we are not wronged ourselves. We wish peace, but we wish the peace of justice, the peace of righteousness. We wish it because we think it is right and not because we are afraid. No weak nation that acts manfully and justly should ever have cause to fear us, and no strong power should ever be able to single us out as a subject for insolent aggression. Imagine President Roosevelt is publishing this speech in a magazine. He needs to come up with a title for it. Which of the following best represents the basic message of the speech?

QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:54 AM

Chapter 1: The Cobbler's Son My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Part A: Which of the following best summarizes a key element of Tommy's character in the excerpt "The Cobbler's Son"? Enter your selection in blank 1 using A, B, C, or D. Tommy has a detailed knowledge of his home town. Tommy is an imaginative boy who yearns for adventure. Tommy knows more about ships than most boys his age. Tommy spends much time at the river's edge watching ships. Part B: Select one quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 2 using E, F, or G. My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor Select one additional quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 3 using H, I, or J. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! Answer for Blank 1: Answer for Blank 2: Answer for Blank 3:

QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:23 AM

Chapter 1: The Cobbler's Son My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Part A: Which of the following best summarizes a key element of Tommy's character in the excerpt "The Cobbler's Son"? Enter your selection in blank 1 using A, B, C, or D. Tommy has a detailed knowledge of his home town. Tommy is an imaginative boy who yearns for adventure. Tommy knows more about ships than most boys his age. Tommy spends much time at the river's edge watching ships. Part B: Select one quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 2 using E, F, or G. My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor Select one additional quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 3 using H, I, or J. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! Answer for Blank 1: Answer for Blank 2: Answer for Blank 3:

QUESTION POSTED AT 02/06/2020 - 01:18 AM

My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. At that time Puddleby was only quite a small town. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge, which led you from the market-place on one side to the churchyard on the other. Sailing-ships came up this river from the sea and anchored near the bridge. I used to go down and watch the sailors unloading the ships upon the river-wall. The sailors sang strange songs as they pulled upon the ropes; and I learned these songs by heart. And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again, across the wide lonely marshes to the sea. I longed to go with them out into the world to seek my fortune in foreign lands—Africa, India, China and Peru! When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town, moving onward slowly—like some gentle giants that walked among the houses without noise. What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! And, dreaming of the lands I had never seen, I'd sit on there, watching till they were out of sight. Part A: Which of the following best summarizes a key element of Tommy's character in the excerpt "The Cobbler's Son"? Enter your selection in blank 1 using A, B, C, or D. Tommy has a detailed knowledge of his home town. Tommy is an imaginative boy who yearns for adventure. Tommy knows more about ships than most boys his age. Tommy spends much time at the river's edge watching ships. Part B: Select one quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 2 using E, F, or G. My name was Tommy Stubbins, son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh; and I was nine and a half years old. A river ran through the middle of it; and over this river there was a very old stone bridge, called Kingsbridge And I would sit on the river-wall with my feet dangling over the water and sing with the men, pretending to myself that I too was a sailor Select one additional quotation that clarifies your choice in Part A. Enter your selection in blank 3 using H, I, or J. For I longed always to sail away with those brave ships when they turned their backs on Puddleby Church and went creeping down the river again When they got round the bend in the river and the water was hidden from view, you could still see their huge brown sails towering over the roofs of the town What strange things would they have seen, I wondered, when next they came back to anchor at Kingsbridge! Answer for Blank 1: Answer for Blank 2: Answer for Blank 3:

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:24 PM

SHARKS' TEETH Langston Carter The day we found the sharks' teeth was foggy and cool. Moisture hung in the air so thick you could almost see it sparkling in the dim sunlight. There were days, early in the summer like this one, where it seemed there was more water in the air than in the bay. We had beached the boat and stepped out on the recently cleared spit of land. The ground had a light dusting of white sand over an under layer of dried black mud. It looked like a recently frosted chocolate cake, though the frosting was spread a bit thin for my taste. The ground was solid, but we knew from experience that it was full of fiddler crab holes, and would be underwater at the first super-high tide. Mysteriously, to us anyway, someone wanted to build a house there. We often came to these spots to look for artifacts. Our beach, our summer home, had been a fishing camp for as long as anyone living could remember. The oldest stories told of travelers coming down to the edge of the sea, lining up to fill their wagon beds with salted fish to take back home. Old decaying cabins still lined the beach. Rotting nets, hung out to dry in the last century, decorated their weathered walls. Their broken faces spun stories in our minds. The fishermen who, tanned and wrinkled from sun and salt, hauled their nets full of splashing mullet in to cheers from the waiting crowds. The bounty of the sea lightened everyone's hearts, and the smell of roasting fish filled the damp air. Women fanned themselves from wagon seats. Children splashed in the shallow edges of the bay. It was a scene we had acted out as youngsters, building an imaginary bridge to a life we would never fully know. Read this sentence from the text: It was a scene we had acted out as youngsters, building an imaginary bridge to a life we would never fully know. Which of the following best explains the phrase an imaginary bridge to a life? The characters could never know if their made-up stories were truthful. The characters had more than one version of the imagined story of the past. The characters feel the past is too far beyond their young imaginations. The characters have happy memories of their past childhood.

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:15 PM

Read Mark Twain's "Two Ways of Seeing a River." What claim does Twain make in this persuasive essay? "All the grace, the beauty, the poetry, had gone out of the majestic river! I still kept in mind a certain wonderful sunset which I witnessed when steamboating was new to me. A broad expanse of the river was turned to blood; in the middle distance the red hue brightened into gold, through which a solitary log came floating, black and conspicuous; in one place a long, slanting mark lay sparkling upon the water; in another the surface was broken by boiling, tumbling rings that were as many-tinted as an opal; where the ruddy flush was faintest was a smooth spot that was covered with graceful circles and radiating lines, ever so delicately traced; the shore on our left was densely wooded, and the somber shadow that fell from this forest was broken in one place by a long, ruffled trail that shone like silver; and high above the forest wall a clean-stemmed dead tree waved a single leafy bough that glowed like a flame in the unobstructed splendor that was flowing from the sun. There were graceful curves, reflected images, woody heights, soft distances, and over the whole scene, far and near, the dissolving lights drifted steadily, enriching it every passing moment with new marvels of coloring. I stood like one bewitched. I drank it in, in a speechless rapture. The world was new to me and I had never seen anything like this at home. But as I have said, a day came when I began to cease from noting the glories and the charms which the moon and the sun and the twilight wrought upon the river’s face; another day came when I ceased altogether to note them. Then, if that sunset scene had been repeated, I should have looked upon it without rapture and should have commented upon it inwardly after this fashion: "This sun means that we are going to have wind tomorrow; that floating log means that the river is rising, small thanks to it; that slanting mark on the water refers to a bluff reef which is going to kill somebody's steamboat one of these nights, if it keeps on stretching out like that; those tumbling 'boils' show a dissolving bar and a changing channel there; the lines and circles in the slick water over yonder are a warning that that troublesome place is shoaling up dangerously; that silver streak in the shadow of the forest is the 'break' from a new snag and he has located himself in the very best place he could have found to fish for steamboats; that tall dead tree, with a single living branch, is not going to last long, and then how is a body ever going to get through this blind place at night without the friendly old landmark?" No, the romance and beauty were all gone from the river. All the value any feature of it had for me now was the amount of usefulness it could furnish toward compassing the safe piloting of a steamboat. " -Understanding the river currents can help you to better appreciate nature. -Knowledge and experience helps you understand the value of nature. -Knowledge and experience changes your perspective toward life. -Appreciating natural beauty enhances your perspective toward life. -Understanding that a river is not all about romance and beauty makes you wise. Only one.

QUESTION POSTED AT 01/06/2020 - 04:08 PM